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BINKYBUNNY FORUMS > HOUSE RABBIT Q & A > Do you think he is ready?
Last Post by Nibbles_NZ at 5/12/2010 4:39 PM (7 Replies)
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User is Offline Nibbles_NZ
773 posts Send Private Message
5/12/2010 2:33 PM

My New Zealand Buck is descending now. Not to be gross but I can really see them now. Is he ready to be neutered? He is 3 1/2 months old but he is probably 5 or 6 lbs. We chose a different vet that was closer and has more experience with bunny surgeries.  We have an appointment for a check up for both bunnies on Tuesday.  The vet is one that does blood work but the more I hear about blood work being done ,the more I agree with having it done. I wouldn't want to lose my little guy while he was under.


User is Offline Beka27
Cleveland, Ohio (USA)
16043 posts Send Private Message
5/12/2010 2:48 PM
Vets will usually neuter males at about 3-4 months. It's not nearly as invasive as a female spay, so it's is commonly done younger.
Meadow..... Photobucket ...... Max, my angel bunny

User is Offline Sarita
(Dallas)
18886 posts Send Private Message
5/12/2010 2:52 PM
LOL. Yes, most definitely he may be altered if the vet feels he can. But 3 1/2 to 4 months especially for our large and lovely rabbits is pretty typical for males that is.

User is Offline Lintini
Bay Area, California
3336 posts Send Private Message
5/12/2010 2:54 PM

I found these questions at the HRS

www.rabbit.org

and I asked the vet all these questions before I had my first rabbit neutered. There was no way I was handing Indy off to a place where they have let bunnies die by just a spueter!


What kinds of questions should I ask the vet?

* about how many rabbit clients does the veterinarian see in a year?

* how many spays/neuters OF RABBITS has the veterinarian has done in the past year?

* what was the success rate?

90% success is way too low. Every doctor, whether for animals or humans will occasionally lose a patient; usually because of an undiagnosed problem. veterinarians across the country who spay and neuter rabbits for the House Rabbit Society have lost on average less than 1/2 of 1%.

* if any were lost, what was the cause?

* does the veterinarian remove both uterus and ovaries? (they should)

* does the veterinarian do "open" or "closed" neuters? (closed is preferable--let your veterinarian explain the difference)

* is entry to the testicles made through the scrotum or the abdomen? (Entry via the abdomen unnecessarily increases the trauma for male rabbits)

* does the veterinarian require withholding of food and water prior to surgery in rabbits? (It is better not to do this--rabbits can't vomit, so there is no risk of that during surgery, and rabbits should never be allowed to get empty digestive tracts)

* what anesthetics are used (some veterinarians are quite successful with anesthetics other than isofluorene, but the bunny is "hung over" after surgery, which increases the probability that s/he will be slow to start eating again, which can lead to serious problems if not dealt with.

* Review the procedure (op and immediate post-op) with your vet. Ask how problems will be detected: how often will they (the veterinarian and the techs) look in on your kid and what will they look for?. What will they do pre-op to find any potential problems? How will they support your bun in the hours after surgery: O2, warmth, quiet (barking dogs and yowling cats in the next cage are probably not helpful), and stimulation? What are they going to do to make it come out right?! Ask questions! That will get your veterinarian's attention. Let them know you're concerned and that you'll be paying attention.



I hope these help, they helped me a lot - here is the section these are from, there is more about pre op/post op too.

http://www.rabbit.org/faq/sections/spay-neuter.html

Photobucket

User is Offline Nibbles_NZ
773 posts Send Private Message
5/12/2010 3:20 PM
Posted By Lintini on 05/12/2010 04:54 PM

I found these questions at the HRS

www.rabbit.org

and I asked the vet all these questions before I had my first rabbit neutered. There was no way I was handing Indy off to a place where they have let bunnies die by just a spueter!


What kinds of questions should I ask the vet?

* about how many rabbit clients does the veterinarian see in a year?

* how many spays/neuters OF RABBITS has the veterinarian has done in the past year?

* what was the success rate?

90% success is way too low. Every doctor, whether for animals or humans will occasionally lose a patient; usually because of an undiagnosed problem. veterinarians across the country who spay and neuter rabbits for the House Rabbit Society have lost on average less than 1/2 of 1%.

* if any were lost, what was the cause?

* does the veterinarian remove both uterus and ovaries? (they should)

* does the veterinarian do "open" or "closed" neuters? (closed is preferable--let your veterinarian explain the difference)

* is entry to the testicles made through the scrotum or the abdomen? (Entry via the abdomen unnecessarily increases the trauma for male rabbits)

* does the veterinarian require withholding of food and water prior to surgery in rabbits? (It is better not to do this--rabbits can't vomit, so there is no risk of that during surgery, and rabbits should never be allowed to get empty digestive tracts)

* what anesthetics are used (some veterinarians are quite successful with anesthetics other than isofluorene, but the bunny is "hung over" after surgery, which increases the probability that s/he will be slow to start eating again, which can lead to serious problems if not dealt with.

* Review the procedure (op and immediate post-op) with your vet. Ask how problems will be detected: how often will they (the veterinarian and the techs) look in on your kid and what will they look for?. What will they do pre-op to find any potential problems? How will they support your bun in the hours after surgery: O2, warmth, quiet (barking dogs and yowling cats in the next cage are probably not helpful), and stimulation? What are they going to do to make it come out right?! Ask questions! That will get your veterinarian's attention. Let them know you're concerned and that you'll be paying attention.



I hope these help, they helped me a lot - here is the section these are from, there is more about pre op/post op too.

http://www.rabbit.org/faq/sections/spay-neuter.html



 

Thank you. I have asked a lot of those questions already I didn't actually talk to the vet though. I will make sure I ask those questions to the vet. So far I know that he does blood work to make sure he doesn't miss anything prior to putting them out. He doesn't make them fast, He is very experienced with bunnies and does a lot of surgeries. I will find out more on Tuesday. They said that if he thinks Baxter is ready he will give me a quote on blood work and I can have the blood work done that day if I choose to.

They were pretty thorough when asking for my pet information: Name, breed, color, DOB or approx age.


User is Offline Elrohwen
Hudson Valley, NY
7322 posts Send Private Message
5/12/2010 3:21 PM
It depends on the vet too. Mine doesn't like to neuter boys before 4 or 5 months, but some do it at 3 months. Since he is larger, I assume they would be comfortable doing him soon since they often want to wait until they are large enough to handle anesthesia and 5-6lbs is big.
- Elrohwen

User is Offline Nibbles_NZ
773 posts Send Private Message
5/12/2010 4:37 PM
I don't know exactly how much he wieghs but he is really big. He was about 3 lbs when we got him and he is A LOT bigger now! 5-6 lbs is just my guess. I will know soon though! LOL

I am soooo scared to let them put him under I would be devastated if something went wrong

User is Offline Nibbles_NZ
773 posts Send Private Message
5/12/2010 4:39 PM
I am happy that my Husband doesn't have a problem with paying for them to get thier surgeries. I am also surprised! He usually isn't so easy when it comes to something being expensive.
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