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BINKYBUNNY FORUMS > HOUSE RABBIT Q & A > Evil cat trying to kill my bunnies!
Last Post by lindsay715 at 10/16/2012 7:16 AM (32 Replies)
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User is Offline ScooterandAnnette
Winnipeg, Canada
1073 posts Send Private Message
10/14/2012 11:43 AM
A cat that is truly 100% feral will not want anything to do with people. My mother has a recued semi-feral cat at home. I managed to trick him into the house and we had him neutered. It took a good probably 4 months before he wanted anything to do with people. He'll still shrink back and run from people sometimes and it's been .... 10 years? Cats that were housecats and were tossed outside, and cats born outside and rescued fairly young will, in my experience, warm up to people much more easily than an older cat that's never been a housecat. So if this cat is people-friendly then it sounds to me like it was either a housecat earlier in it's life, or it's still a fairly young cat. The description of the pouncing and swatting makes me think that the cat is likely a teenager.

The first cat Bailey was introduced to was Harley, who was bought in the hopes he'd be companion for Bailey. Bailey took one look at him, charged him and chased him up onto the couch. Mind you Bailey also charged at dogs. But all of the bunnies have held their ground against my cats, even when the cats were kittens or when I have foster kittens in the house. Yes the would occasionally get swatted at, and they would charge the cat and that would be the end of that, at least for while.

And I 2nd the idea of getting the soft-paws for the cat. They can be a pain to put on (I've put them on my mom's cats before) but they are effective.

- Annette
Pet Parents to: Aeryn, Tegan, and Keelie, (bunnies); Harley, Sierra, Ringo and Owen (cats); Dakota (dog). We miss our Rainbow Bunnies: Keiran, Kylie, Reno, Carbun, Kaylee and our boy Bailey.

User is Offline Bones
146 posts Send Private Message
10/14/2012 11:48 AM

You could try spraying lemon juice around your door because cats hate the smell of citrus. Cats also hate the smell of vinegar but so do a lot of people so I'm not sure if that would be something you would want to do. 

EDIT: I have used Soft Paws before too and they were really great but I have 10 cats so now I just clip their nails. You can get a off brand of Soft Paws on e-bay for $2.


User is Offline Roberta
Wanneroo, Western Australia
2737 posts Send Private Message
10/14/2012 2:44 PM
Would you be allowed to put a small cabin hook on the door, they are relatively cheap to buy and easy to install. You can buy them just about anywhere. Here's a link so you can see what I am talking about http://www.bosunbobs.com/Models.asp...pQodRiIAkw
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User is Offline Roberta
Wanneroo, Western Australia
2737 posts Send Private Message
10/14/2012 3:04 PM
Oh, and maybe some sheets of cardboard around the cage with double sided tape of fly paper on it so that the cat cannot stand right at the cage if it gets in. Cheap solution and you just make it wide enough to stop the cat but not block your access. Cats do not like things stuck to their feet !!
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User is Offline LBJ10
5058 posts Send Private Message
10/15/2012 8:32 AM
I like the soft paws idea. How friendly is the cat to you? Does it like you? Some cats are more accepting of being picked up and manipulated than others. I know I could have put the soft paws nail caps on my kitty no problem since he would let me do just about anything to him. He was declawed though (he came to us that way) so I don't have any personal experience to how well they work.

I also like Roberta's idea. If you don't want to use something sticky, my vet suggested another deterrent method. Buy a vinyl runner, the kind that you put down to protect new carpet. Get the kind with the nubs on the bottom. Flip it over so the nubs are facing up. Kitty won't want to walk across it because it feels weird on their paws. It doesn't hurt them at all, they just don't like to walk on it. My vet suggested it to us and we tried it. It was pretty effective at keeping our cat away from the house plants.

User is Offline Ackattack
Berea, Ohio
27 posts Send Private Message
10/15/2012 10:29 AM
I will definitely pick up something lemon scented and spray on the outside of the door to see if that has an effect. I know for a fact the cat doesn't like the smell of mint (I put my toothbrush near him and he took off running in the opposite direction). I just personally would rather have the entry way smell like citrus over mint - so we shall see.

I will check into some material for the floor too if the scents do not work.

LBJ10 - The cat is semi-friendly towards me I guess? I avoid him and or chase him because I am slightly allergic through physical contact (hives / itchyness) therefore my roommates handle him. He was feral but he is still pretty young because I have noticed he is still growing. He has grown very accustomed to people and LOVES the landowner... but tends to run away from everyone else or is at least very cautious. But not at all aggressive towards us.

User is Offline RabbitPam
South Florida
Forum Leader
10448 posts Send Private Message
10/15/2012 11:18 AM
I think you've presented many important reasons here for why the cat is not working out as a member of your household, not the least of which is your own health. My suggestion is to have a group discussion with all the members of the house, roommates and landlord, and put all of the problems that have come up on the table and discuss possible options.

This cat needs a good home, but one where its feral nature is understood and worked with carefully. I think that may mean a rescue shelter that has experience with semi-feral cats may be the ones to take it in and help it become domesticated once again, and re-homed in a place where it will receive a lot of attention and care without many distractions (like bunnies.)

Had you known your landlord was going to have a cat, knowing you have allergies and bunnies, you probably would have found a different place to live. So, in all fairness, your landlord is breaching your understanding and agreement, and needs to be more willing to compromise. There are kind options for everyone involved, but it needs to be talked out calmly so all of you can have a peaceful household in which to live and study.

Many people who become landlords believe it is like parenting, ie. "my house, my rules." It's not actually. It's "I agree to provide these acceptable conditions in exchange for you complying with our agreed upon house rules for an exchange of rent for an agreed upon time." Landlords, as well as tenants, ie roommates, who breach these agreements and must either change to comply or be held accountable. You may be expected to keep quiet hours, for example, but your landlord is also expected to keep health standards. Please let us know your progress with your roommates and landlord.
 photo CarrotCrop100x500BBSiggy_zps0f2147e4.jpg Have your people call my people. We'll do carrots.

User is Offline lindsay715
NJ, USA
149 posts Send Private Message
10/15/2012 2:13 PM
I agree with RabbitPam completely. Landlords do have responsibilities to the tenants, and you have rights as a paying renter. I think your allergy alone is enough that the landlord should rethink having the cat... if the matter was not discussed in the lease or during the signing of the lease, the landlord is inviting legal problems in subjecting a tenant to living conditions that compromise his or her health.

User is Offline Ackattack
Berea, Ohio
27 posts Send Private Message
10/15/2012 4:49 PM

Unfortunately, I signed the lease knowing that there could be a POTENTIAL of a  cat (I was told that they were "nursing" a cat, but really wanted to buy a dog). Since I only have a an allergic reaction through physical touch and I was suppose to get a room with a door that closes AND the rent is unbeatably low, I signed with all this knowledge. Problem is... the person's room whom we were originally going to take (with the door) decided to stay. In an effort to keep all of our rents low we had to stay in the room with the sliding door. Big mistake on my part regarding the signing for very low cost / affordable rent - the signing of the lease is done and very little can be done (as discussed by my recent talk with my landlord).


On top of this finding - the cat is becoming more brave and decided to wait around the corner of the sliding door where we cant see, sprint between our legs, and swatted full speed (claws retracted) at one of our bunnies across the top of the head. THANKFULLY there were not marks... we think our bunny reacted too quickly for the cat.

Citrus and mint filling the hallways leading to the door it is.

We are also thinking about putting up a gate. Cat would easily hop it I am sure... but one more barrier is another second for our slow human reactions 


User is Offline LBJ10
5058 posts Send Private Message
10/15/2012 6:34 PM
Did you see my suggestion about the vinyl runner? It might be worth a try.

User is Offline Ackattack
Berea, Ohio
27 posts Send Private Message
10/15/2012 7:17 PM
Yes I saw your post about that. Since it's a cheap alternative to the scat mat I will probably try that first. If it doesn't work - I might just cave and buy the mint / citrus spray and scat mat to place outside the door.

User is Offline RabbitPam
South Florida
Forum Leader
10448 posts Send Private Message
10/16/2012 6:48 AM
Your loophole is that you signed the lease with the understanding that you were getting the room with the door, therefore you were willing to accept limited exposure to the cat. The person changing their mind is yet another 'oops' on the part of the landlord. Ask to switch rooms. (It might annoy that person enough to get them to also advocate for rehoming the cat.)

I mean, this whole thing ends in 10 months, right? So can your landlord ask someone to foster the cat for that long and then welcome it back with open arms as you wave a relieved goodbye to this whole arrangement next year? Be sure to have that house meeting soon.
 photo CarrotCrop100x500BBSiggy_zps0f2147e4.jpg Have your people call my people. We'll do carrots.

User is Offline lindsay715
NJ, USA
149 posts Send Private Message
10/16/2012 7:16 AM
In my state there is a part of the tenant rights handbook that describes controlling pets: "If you are allowed to have a pet, you must maintain control over it. If you allow your pet to damage the property or interfere with the rights of other tenants, your landlord can demand that you control your pet or remove the animal from the building." I assume that the same applies to the landlord, since she is living on the premises. I would look up the laws for your own state.

The cat coming into your room at all would be a violation of the above, I believe.  (Especially taking into account your allergy.)

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