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BINKYBUNNY FORUMS > HOUSE RABBIT Q & A > White maggots in rabbit's poo
Last Post by SmokeyBunnyRobinson at 1/06/2011 3:01 PM (26 Replies)
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User is Offline Pandapon
5 posts Send Private Message
1/02/2011 3:47 PM

 I noticed today that in my Bonbon's poos are little white worms/maggots wiggling. Now I'm guilty of only changing his cage once per week due to my busy schedule, but I never realized that there would be parasites going in contact w/ my baby

We live up north where it's always around 30'F, and flies are rare to be seen around (except near the dumpster at the end of the city), so I don't find how this would be a fly strike. But base on all the infos I've read on Google, this sounds just like a fly strike, and I'm very worry for my rabbit.

I know that I should find a vet, but other than spending $300 on a vet trip where they'll rip money off me that I earn so hard for, is there any expert in here that deal with this and has some ideas on how to treat this nasty problem? It would be much appreciated.


User is Offline LoveChaCha
Rabbit Warren
6569 posts Send Private Message
1/02/2011 3:51 PM

Hi and Welcome

Is your bunny outside? And how long has he been having this problem?

How far is your vet from you and are you satisfied with their work? I know rabbits can become very sick and can possibly die fast if not seen by a vet  I hope someone else can give you more advice.

PhotobucketPhotobucket85207e9097ee11e18cf91231380fd29b_6

User is Offline Pandapon
5 posts Send Private Message
1/02/2011 4:14 PM
I never let my rabbit outside cuz we dont have a garden and it's always cold here, we just had Bonbon since September and the weather was cool down by then. This problem just started about 1-2 weeks ago.

I don't like the vet around my area. One time my parents took our dog there to have his leg checked because he fell down the bed and he was a small breed. Apparently they forcefully pulled his leg out to check when he was under anesthesia and that worsen the condition, then they asked $2000 for an operation. It's unethical and I shall never let any of my pet suffer those kind of treatment again.
Every vets asked 300-400 just to neuter my rabbit, so there's no way they would lower the price to do a worm check on him.

That's why, if anyone can tell me how i can treat this, it would be much help. Tomorrow i'll try to give him a warm bath to make sure no maggots are on his fur or skin.

User is Offline LoveChaCha
Rabbit Warren
6569 posts Send Private Message
1/02/2011 4:22 PM

300-400 dollar is a high price to neuter a rabbit, but the vets want to do tests such as blood work and samples to be sure rabbit is 100% okay for surgery. I paid $135 for my rabbit's spay, so paying in the 100s is not uncommon. Do you have a Humane Society or a shelter in your area? They will do low cost spays/neuters : ) Since i"ve had a rabbit, I've noticed that they are not very cheap animals to keep, but are very fun indeed

How much is a exam? Do you live in the states? I could give you a site to look for recommended vets by the House Rabbit Society. I would advise you get bunny to a vet, especially if it sounds like worms/parasites are in your bunny. You don't need to go to your vet if you don't trust them.

http://www.rabbit.org/vets/vets.html
 

If you need to make calls around for vets, be sure to ask how many rabbits are seen on a weekly/monthly basis, how much an exam is, how many spays/neuters are done.
have you given your rabbit a bath before? It isn't recommended because bunny could go into shock.

PhotobucketPhotobucket85207e9097ee11e18cf91231380fd29b_6

User is Offline GinaH
74 posts Send Private Message
1/02/2011 4:51 PM

I have had rabbits for about 6-7 years and have never heard of this unfortunately.  However, i would think this would need to be treated by a vet.  I don't think it will cost so much.  A "fecal float" to test for parasites is about $25, plus maybe a $60 vet visit and some medication.

oh ETA:  please don't wait to make the vet appt.  I would not think that this would go away on its own.


User is Offline Pandapon
5 posts Send Private Message
1/02/2011 4:51 PM
They do have a Humane society around here but they don't take care of rabbit that much, i could still look around. I do live in the state, Maine to be precisely.
I did give my rabbit a bath before, I am not sure what going in shock means, does that include running around like crazy and trying to jump out of the bathtub?
So apparently I have no other choice than going to the vet it seems...

User is Offline LizzieKnittyBun
Broomfield, CO
2147 posts Send Private Message
1/02/2011 5:00 PM
No, going into shock is a lot more serious than that. The rabbit can freeze up physically, have a rapid pulse, shallow breathing, chills, or even black out and lose consciousness. Rabbits can be very prone to anxiety and even die from it if it causes them to go into shock.

I know vets can be expensive, but we earn our money partly in order to take care of ourselves and our beloved pets when they need it.

Please keep us updated!! I've never of this either, and I'm very curious as to what it is.

User is Offline LoveChaCha
Rabbit Warren
6569 posts Send Private Message
1/02/2011 5:00 PM
If you don't like your vet, you dont need to go to him/her. I have had bad experiences with 2 vets. They did not take the time to examine my rabbit and just wanted my money. I felt cheated and my rabbit's ear infection didn't go away. I have a vet that will answer all of my questions and doesn't rush me out of the room.

I wish you luck and hope that you find a good vet
PhotobucketPhotobucket85207e9097ee11e18cf91231380fd29b_6

User is Offline FluffyBunny
Boulder, Colorado
1170 posts Send Private Message
1/02/2011 5:08 PM

It really sounds like your bunny needs to be checked out. Fly strike can be a life-threatening condition, so if there's any question about whether or not your bunny might have it, he needs to see a vet ASAP. If it's an internal parasite, bathing him won't do much good.

A simple exam and fecal test shouldn't cost much at a good vet.

"Time flies when you have a bun!" | "Ask not what your bunny can do for you, but what you can do for your bunny."
Here comes Mr. Bunny-tail, hoppin' down the rabby trail.
Hippity hoppity, binkitty floppity, Bunbun's on his way.
Then hops down Ms. Rabbit-girl, hoppin' down the bunny
trail. Hippity hoppity, binkitty floppity, Rabby's on her way.


User is Offline Bumblebunny
135 posts Send Private Message
1/02/2011 5:28 PM
The website bunspace and the house rabbit society website list vets in different states. Maybe you can find one close to you.

User is Offline Pandapon
5 posts Send Private Message
1/02/2011 7:09 PM
okay I'll call the vet up tomorrow morning... I don't want my rabbit to die... I just read some nasty stuff about how fly strike goes into stage-two where the parasites live under rabbit's skin and eat the rabbit alive...oh god oh god...

User is Offline Pandapon
5 posts Send Private Message
1/02/2011 9:03 PM
okay I just read some more info on Google...
it sounds like this is more of a Pinworm case than a Fly strike...now that make more sense because my rabbit hasn't been in contact with any flies, and maybe he got worms from eating old vegetables that I left overnight in his cage...is there any de-worm over-the-counter medicines for this?

User is Offline Momto3boys
122 posts Send Private Message
1/03/2011 1:14 AM
Are they worms or maggots??

If he has contact with flies then I would guess a fly laid eggs in your buns litter...one of their favorite places to lay them, those eggs hatched and now you have maggots. I've heard of this numerous times. Try cleaning out his litter ATLEAST twice a week, if not more.

User is Offline Kafrn
754 posts Send Private Message
1/03/2011 2:07 AM
This is a common problem with rabbits in SA too. Clean twice a week and check bunny regularly for dirty spots around bottom, and also check any wounds just to be on the safe side. This can happen to indoor rabbits too, it only takes one fly. Blowies lay live maggots, check your rabbits bum and fur fo what looks like moving sand. They grow up in 5 days or so b keep litter tray clean to avoid infestation.
What weighs 35 tonnes, has four fuzzy ears and is 80 million years old? Two rabbits riding a brontosaurus.

User is Offline Kafrn
754 posts Send Private Message
1/03/2011 2:11 AM
Also, if fly strike occurs under the skin, it's still quite obvious as long as you don't have pre existing deep wounds that they're hiding in. Remove all maggots with tweezers, if to small they can be washed off. Toxicity of maggots can kill a rabbit. But only if theyve had them for a few days. People will hate me for saying this but if it's heavily infested under the skin with fly strike, fly spray is actually less toxic to the rabbit than the actual maggots, but only as a last resort.
What weighs 35 tonnes, has four fuzzy ears and is 80 million years old? Two rabbits riding a brontosaurus.

User is Offline Kafrn
754 posts Send Private Message
1/03/2011 2:24 AM
Sorry about multiple posts, can't edit on iPad. Seriously, just check rabbit over carefully daily in hot weather. Maggots on or in rabbit are fairly obvious, just keep a close eye out on bottom, nostrils and any wounds, clean tray and you'll be fine
What weighs 35 tonnes, has four fuzzy ears and is 80 million years old? Two rabbits riding a brontosaurus.

User is Offline jerseygirl
Australia
14999 posts Send Private Message
1/03/2011 3:07 AM

I had thought similar to Momto3boys also, that a fly may have laid eggs in the litter. But absolutely check the rabbits back end thoroughly. If evidence of flystrike you must move on it quickly. It's a terrible condition as you have already read.

For other things like pin worms and round worms, there are over the counter treatments but they only treat particular types of parasites. A waste of money if you don't know exactly what it is.

Whoever says "It's only a rabbit" has obviously never loved a rabbit.

User is Offline Beka27
Cleveland, Ohio (USA)
Forum Leader
15781 posts Send Private Message
1/03/2011 6:00 AM
Welcome to Binkybunny. You've gotten great advice so far so I won't restate what's already been said.

Can you tell us more about your rabbit? How old is he? Is he your first rabbit? Are you familiar with rabbit health and do you have plans to neuter him?
Meadow..... Photobucket ...... Max, my angel bunny

User is Offline Sarita
(Dallas)
Forum Leader
18052 posts Send Private Message
1/03/2011 6:41 AM
You need to get a fecal test to check for the worms and let the vet determine the treatment.

Also, you should never give your rabbit baths...they don't need them.

Please keep us updated.

User is Offline KatnipCrzy
Holland, MI
Forum Leader
2982 posts Send Private Message
1/03/2011 7:07 AM

I agree- your bunny needs to go to the vet.  Even if it is an intestinal worm that does not affect the skin of the rabbit- the bunny needs to be treated- and your vet will be able to determine what kind of worm it is.  It is doubtful that your bunny got worms from veggies that were left out overnight- it is more likely that your rabbit has intestinal parasites since he was a baby and you are only noticing worms now because the worm load is so high that he is passing more worms.  Unfortunately it is not uncommon for many baby bunnies, puppies or kittens to get intestinal parasites from their mother/environmental conditions that they are raised in.  Some worms can infect people too- especially children that are not as careful about hygiene- so it is important to test and treat pets!

Cotton and Schroeder- Mini Lops Griffin- English Lop
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