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BINKYBUNNY FORUMS > BEHAVIOR > My bunny is biting me!
Last Post by mocha200 at 12/02/2009 3:41 PM (15 Replies)
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User is Offline mocha200
4503 posts Send Private Message
11/29/2009 1:21 PM

My bunny is biting me and my cloths. what should i do?


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User is Offline Monkeybun
Hillsboro, Oregon
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11/29/2009 1:34 PM
How old is your bunny? Has it been spayed/neutered? How long have you had it?

User is Offline mocha200
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11/29/2009 1:40 PM
well i have two bunnies ones a boy and ones a girl, they are both about 6 months old, they are not spayed or neutered, i got the boy about 5 months ago, and i got the girl about two weeks ago. the girl bits more than the boy i think.
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User is Offline MooBunnay
Dallas, Texas (Allen)
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11/29/2009 2:03 PM
When I hold my bunnies they often start digging and re-arranging my clothing, and biting it in the process. Spaying and neutering is important to help with both health and behavior issues, but the digging and re-arranging may continue after they are fixed. When mine start nibbling at my clothes they usually either want to get down on the ground to play, want to be petted, or I'm in their way. So if I am holding them and they do this, I try petting them on the head first. If that doesn't stop them, then I put them down on the ground to play. If I am in their way... well I just move so they can get by me

User is Offline Elrohwen
Hudson Valley, NY
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11/29/2009 2:09 PM
Often young bunnies bite as a form of play. I've found walking away is pretty effective if they're playing - they quickly learn that biting makes their playmate go away. Most of this biting was on my clothes, not me, so it wasn't meant to be aggressive. I think it will improve as they age and as they are spayed and neutered.
- Elrohwen

User is Offline Monkeybun
Hillsboro, Oregon
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11/29/2009 2:10 PM
6 months old, they are getting hormonal. Now is when you'd want to get them fixed. And keep them apart so there are no surprise babies!

Monkey occasionally nipped at me or the hubby when she started gettign a bit hormonal, but usually only when we'd go and move her stuff around. She wasn't too fond of that. You may want to give them their own space that you don't mess with when they are around.

User is Offline mocha200
4503 posts Send Private Message
11/29/2009 2:10 PM
oh i see, but what about when my friends and family come over and they stick their finger in there and he bites them but when i do it he dose not
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User is Offline MooBunnay
Dallas, Texas (Allen)
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11/29/2009 2:17 PM
Bunnies are pretty territorial, especially when they are not spayed, so they may be biting because your friends are putting their fingers in their territory. Also, they may think that your friends have some food, and are taking a taste of their finger to see if it is a treat! A better way for you friends to pet your bunnies would be to allow the bunnies to come out of their cage, and then have your friends sit on the floor with your bunnies. Allow the bunnies to approach them without petting or anything, so that your bunnies can see that your friends will not hurt them. Then, after awhile they can try petting them.

User is Offline mocha200
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11/29/2009 2:20 PM
ok, thanks
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User is Offline MooBunnay
Dallas, Texas (Allen)
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11/29/2009 2:24 PM

You're welcome - let us know how it goes!


User is Offline mocha200
4503 posts Send Private Message
11/29/2009 2:24 PM
ok
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User is Offline Quantum
Olympia, WA USA
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11/30/2009 4:27 PM
Agreeing with the hormonal theory. Something else to consider is that when buns groom each other, they'll remove stickers, burrs or other foreign matter/irregularities from one another's fur. If the bun finds a fuzz-ball on a sweater or a seam line, lump or other thing that doesn't feel "right" (at least as far as Bun is concerned!), they'll try to nip it off. My husbands "fluffier" sweats and the seams of my blue jeans have both been nibbled by buns trying to "fix" things. And being the adorable, single-minded (i.e. **stubborn!!!**) little critters they are, they'll keep trying to work on it as long as it's within reach.

User is Offline mocha200
4503 posts Send Private Message
12/02/2009 10:15 AM
oh i see
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User is Offline jerseygirl
Australia
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12/02/2009 3:13 PM

Being of that age and unfixed as yet, it likely reason behind behaviour. I do wonder if the female is having a false pregnancy or a real one though? Where did you get her from? Was she in with other rabbits? Could she have gotten with your buck accidently? Unspayed females can experience false pregnancies too (especially when being around unfixed males) where they behave as if they are actually pregnant - often becoming more aggressive.


User is Offline RabbitPam
South Florida
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12/02/2009 3:33 PM
jersey, it doesn't really sound to me like a false pregnancy since she isn't building a nest with her fur.

Sammy sets her teeth frequently, and it's partly because she's young and partly her personality. But your bunny, Haley, already knows you well enough to not bite you hard but just use her teeth like Moo described to communicate with you.

Another way to convey disapproval of her biting you is to let out a high pitched squeal. Bunnies do that if they are in pain, so she will think she's hurt you with her biting. I did that to Sammy this week and she stopped, then licked me to make up with me by giving me bunny kisses. They rarely intend to hurt you. As for the clothes, just say NO and move the cloth away. If you can get some chew toys or sticks instead, hand her one so she can chew on something good for her.
 photo CarrotCrop100x500BBSiggy_zps0f2147e4.jpg Have your people call my people. We'll do carrots.

User is Offline mocha200
4503 posts Send Private Message
12/02/2009 3:41 PM
oh ok
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